Narconon—A True Example of “Holistic” Treatment

I was disappointed to find a treatment center that used psychiatric drugs, touting its services as being “holistic.”

It used to be that holistic meant something. It was akin to all-natural and all-encompassing. This particular treatment center made the argument that psychiatric medications are part of treating the whole person. But I disagree.

Psychiatric medications do not address issues of honor, integrity, responsibility or identity, and these are the things that an addict has lost, and they will never be found in a bottle of pills.

It’s ironic—don’t you think—that the drug treatment industry has fallen prey to big Pharma, who has pushed the dogma suggesting that symptoms of addiction like depression and anxiety are physical problems, and need to be handled by physical means such as medication. In other words, what big Pharma is saying is that you don’t need street drugs to solve your problems, you need their drugs.

The irony, of course, is that most antidepressants increase depression, they even increase homicidal ideation, violent acts, thoughts of suicide, and about 1,000 other side effects you wouldn’t wish on your worst enemy. And yet, they claim this to be “holistic.”

Students doiong the Narconon Program

To me, holistic means treating the entire person, physically, mentally and spiritually. While Narconon does not promote religion per se, it does promote getting a person into a condition where he will do the right thing. It promotes good health, both mentally and physically, while spirituality is something that comes from a person who is in good shape otherwise. I think it’s important but I think each person needs to find his own path, and Narconon promotes this. It’s called self-determinism. It’s what is lacking in most addicts and alcoholics. They are self-determined to self-destruct, and they are good at it.

What Narconon gave me is the ability to be self-determined about what I believe to be true for me. Show me a pill that can give you that and I’ll be the first one in line.

AUTHOR

Steve

Steve grew up in Berkeley, California. There, he was exposed to drug use while still in grammar school. Over the next two decades, his family tried many times to help Steve, but it wasn’t until 2001 when he was introduced to Narconon that he recovered permanently. Two weeks after graduating, Steve did his first intervention. He was told the situation was next to impossible. Two days later, Steve drove the addict to the front doors of Narconon. Since that day, Steve has helped hundreds of families help those they love as a professional interventionist. You can contact Steve through his site or on LinkedIn.