Tag Archives: use

Marijuana Use Among Teens More Common than Cigarette Smoking While Alcohol Use Goes Down

What parents want for their children and what children are doing with their lives still seem to be on divergent paths. Parents generally want their kids to learn job skills or to prepare for careers, and to proceed safely through life until they develop enough experience to have good judgment. But more teens are now smoking marijuana, not exactly on the path that parents might choose. In fact, marijuana use among teens is more common than cigarette smoking according to the most recent survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Teen Marijuana Use More

However, there are a couple of good signs. Alcohol consumption is down slightly and cigarette smoking has also been trending down, dropping to 18.7% this year, down from 21.6% in 2006. As for how many were smoking marijuana, that was 23% of American teens.

Far more teens are drinking than smoking cigarettes. In 1997, 74.8% had drunk in the past year and last year, just 63.5% did. But use of narcotics other than heroin stayed at a high level, maintaining the level it reached after steady increases from 1992 through 2001.

Teens Feel Marijuana Does Not Make them Bad Drivers

Another recent survey of teens showed that they did not feel that smoking marijuana had a negative influence on their driving, but a study published in the British Medical journal showed that driving within three hours of using marijuana makes one twice as likely to have an accident as someone who drives sober.

For Getting Clean of a Drug, Narconon Program Provides Success

For tens of thousands of people around the world who want to stop using a drug, Narconon program has provided a way to do so. Not only that, this program has provided a way to repair the damage that addiction does, and to build new sober living skills. So often after addiction lasting years or even decades, a person loses their abilities to make sober choices. The Narconon program walks each person through the process of learning how to stay sober.

At their own pace, each person takes on each challenge presented by one of the Narconon life skills courses, starting with the simplest but most essential skill: the ability to face another person and communicate one’s intention clearly. They also learn to listen to another person and acknowledge them properly. These simple skills start to put each person in control of their own life for the first time since the addiction began.

Once this is done, each person then goes through a deep detoxification process that uses time in a sauna, nutritional supplements and moderate daily exercise. This combination has been proven to enable the body to flush out old stored toxins lodged deep in the fatty tissues of the body. These toxins include residues from past drug use that can contribute to the triggering of cravings, even years after drug use stops. The presence of these toxins is part of the reason that a person may be sober for years and then suddenly lose the battle.

Then as each person walks through the rest of the program, they gradiently build skills like knowing who to associate with who will support their sobriety and how to deal with those who might bring it to an end, solving problems instead of letting them drive you to escape in drugs or drink, and use of a common sense moral code. All these steps culminate in the ability to stay sober after graduation for seven out of ten people who finish this program and return home.

Learn more about the Narconon program and how it provides sobriety in fifty locations around the world. Call an Intake Counselor today at 1-800-775-8750.

Resources:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/08/marijuana-use-among-us-te_n_1582017.html

It’s No Surprise that Drug Use Goes Up as Jobs Go Away

Drug Use IncreaseReports from Florida show that when economic stresses mount related to unemployment, more people may be reaching for a pill. Particularly, in this region, OxyContin obtained illicitly, as from a drug dealer or by theft. Or it could be obtained by doctor shopping or prescription fraud. Whatever the method a person uses to get the drug, one thing is certain. The drug is seriously addictive. Speed of addiction does vary somewhat from person to person. Some people may dabble in OxyContin for awhile without being trapped but for many people, it may only take a few uses before the cravings begin to drive them back into more use of the drug whether they want to go there or not.

When drug use is up as jobs go away, it doesn’t solve the unemployment problem. Drug use will only impel a person further into depression and guilt. Most people feel stressed and may become depressed when they are unemployed. Pills, joints or drinks may make that feeling go away for a little while. But they don’t solve the unemployment. Nor do they help a person face the search for a job, employment interviews or the stress of a new job.

In Florida, the social services agencies are trying to help people get free from the drug use so they can look for new jobs. Drug abuse and addiction can lead unemployed people to crime instead of job hunting. In Highland County in Florida, the county clerk estimated that 60% of those who were being arrested had drug problems. It could be asked whether the problems caused people to hide in drug use or the drug use created problems. Probably both paths are correct for different individuals.

Solving the Addiction Problem so People Can Return to Work

It is very common for people to lose jobs when they become addicted. The grip that drugs like OxyContin, Vicodin, heroin, cocaine or alcohol get on people becomes stronger than many people’s grip on their work ethic. Being at work begins to involve explaining absences, making excuses for work that isn’t done, covering up signs of drug abuse, perhaps even shifting the blame to other workers to protect oneself.

The same excuses and shift of blame that occurs at work also occurs at home. A person who is addicted begins to spin tales for a spouse, make excuses to children, siblings, parents. The need for more drugs takes over as a primary concern in life.

Recovery from this obsession to get and use drugs must be thorough and complete for the sobriety to be lasting.

Narconon Services Cover the Many Aspects of Addiction

For rehab to work and for sobriety to last, a recovery program must address the many kinds of injury that result from being addicted. For example, a person must recover their own personal integrity. They must learn how to face people again and communicate clearly – families are all too aware that an addicted loved one has lost this capacity. He (or she) must also have a way to reduce the cravings that threaten him every time his guard is down for a moment. Narconon services cover each of these points thoroughly.

The Narconon drug and alcohol rehabilitation program is a long-term program – one that gives the addicted person time to learn the basics of the life skills that are needed to overcome each of these kinds of damage. Then each person must have time and guidance to apply that new knowledge to themselves. As they do so, they build a new, drug-free life, step by step.

Addiction is not overcome in a month-long rehab. It takes longer than that to repair and rebuild. In fifty locations around the world, the Narconon program guides those who are addicted through this essential process of recovery. Call 1-800-775-8750 to find out more about how it works.

Resources:

http://www2.highlandstoday.com/news/news/2012/may/09/lanewso1-drugs-use-up-as-jobs-go-away-ar-401442/

Why it’s Not Surprising that Heroin Use Soars for Suburban Teens

Recent news reports are describing the increases in heroin abuse among American teenagers. These are not urban teens but suburban ones. Heroin rates in large Northeastern cities have always been higher than in suburbs or rural areas but that trend has been changing. Parents who moved their children out to the suburbs where they thought their kids would be safer are finding that heroin seems to have followed them to their new homes.
Teen Heroin Use
But if you have been tracking with the changes in drug abuse in the last few years, it’s no surprise that heroin use soars for suburban teens. The reason behind this shift has to do with the prescription drug Oxycontin. This opiate and others like fentanyl and hydrocodone have been popular drugs of abuse for several years. For suburban teens, abusing OxyContin and the others has been more acceptable than driving to the city to score heroin. They could find it in their own medicine chests in some cases, or buy it from fellow students. They may have even been prescribed this drug themselves, after a sports accident.

OxyContin is one of the more quickly addictive drugs. A person who parties with OxyContin or a similar drug may soon find that the cravings drive him back to use the drug again and again.

The Switch to Heroin

But chemically, OxyContin is similar to heroin. And heroin is cheaper than OxyContin, which generally costs about $1 per milligram. The 80 milligram pill is a popular one among abusers, so the money will go fast when this is the chosen drug of abuse. If a person runs out of money, he may go looking for heroin, which is considerably cheaper, as little as one-tenth the price. And since a person addicted to OxyContin is often going to start struggling to deal with normal life activities like jobs, school and family life, he (or she) may soon be out of a job and scrambling to keep the withdrawal sickness away.

The other factor driving the switch to heroin is the change in the composition of OxyContin. In 2010, Purdue Pharma changed the formulation of OxyContin so it cannot be crushed and snorted or dissolved and injected. The pill is now gummy and much harder to abuse. This change drove many people to switch from the prescription formulation to the street drug. Once the change in formulation was announced, it was not hard to predict the next trend. And as that trend arrived, it was seen that heroin use soared for suburban teens.

Narcononhawaii.org Sees Same Problem in the Islands

As far back as 2002, Hawaii was struggling with increases in OxyContin abuse. Despite the high price of heroin, some people made the shift to the street drug. In 2010, the FBI arrested twelve people for trafficking heroin into the islands, as they saw an opportunity to make money from the destruction of others with this shift in consumption.

At the Narcononhawaii.org website, you can find out how people in Hawaii can recover from addiction to heroin, methamphetamine or prescription drugs. The Narconon program offers a long-term, holistic program. “Holistic” means that the whole person is considered, and each one is helped to gain back the physical health and mental strength that they need to stay sober after they go home.

It takes longer than 28 days to repair the damage done by addiction. Many people who have failed at short-term rehabs find lasting success at a Narconon drug rehab. For complete details on this successful program, visit www.narcononhawaii.org or call 1-800-775-8750 today.

More Articles:

http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2002/Jan/09/ln/l0n1a.html

http://articles.nydailynews.com/2012-06-20/news/32339720_1_heroin-addicts-heroin-overdose-heroin-abuse

Eliminating a New Threat: Dangerous K2 Drug Effects and K2 Abuse

It seems like those working in the illicit drug industry are industriously working to keep one step ahead of law enforcement and drug users. It seems they are able to release one new synthetic drug after another onto the market, catching the interest of those who might believe the hype about how “legal” a new drug is and what a great effect it has. One of the latest drugs to appear in this way is a drug being called K2. In some areas, it’s also called “Spice” and it is said to be a synthetic cannabinoid – in other words, a chemical that is similar in composition and effect to marijuana.

K2 Effects

In some areas, these new drugs are not covered by existing laws, and until legislation catches up, a dealer can state that a new synthetic drug is a “legal” high. Naive users may believe this.

One of the additional selling points for K2 is that it will not register on the usual drug tests that might be administered by employers, schools or parents. Eventually, all these points will catch up to K2 and it will be able to be seized and the dealers arrested for the damage they are doing.

K2 Drives Thousands of Call to Poison Control Centers

In less that two years, there were more than 4,000 calls to national Poison Control centers that involved K2 drug effects and K2 abuse. As K2 drug effects and K2 abuse can cause severe anxiety, aggression, threatening behavior and an inability to speak, more and more young people are turing up emergency rooms as well. The main public using this drug are young people who are inexperienced with drug use or the adverse effects that can result.

But at times, these effects have been far more serious than anxiety or aggression. In Wisconsin, a young man who had taken K2 went into convulsions and was admitted to the hospital. Some people experience terrible headaches or uncontrollable hallucinations. One young man who smoked the drug with friends committed suicide later the same night. In another part of Wisconsin, the police were seizing thousands of dollars of this drug just as two sixteen-year-olds were being taken the the hospital for seizures resulting from use of K2. The laws in Wisconsin have caught up to the dealers of this drug and it is already illegal for sale or use.

K2 is also addictive. This means that even if K2 drug effects and K2 abuse cause terrible harm, the person is driven to use the drug over and over again.

At Narconon, Drug Addiction to K2 Can be Overcome

Narconon provides a way for a person to overcome an addiction to K2 and get life back under control again. At Narconon, drug addiction is treated in a long-term program that builds personal integrity, health and sober living skills.
One of the most essential phases of this recovery program is the Narconon New Life Detoxification Program. Cravings are aggravated by the storage of drug residues in the fatty tissues of the body. Even years after drug use ended, these lodged residues can contribute to sudden cravings. By flushing these residues out in a sauna-based program, each person in recovery has a better chance to find lasting sobriety. Those completing this program talking about their brighter outlooks and reduced cravings. Some people even say those cravings are gone when this phase is complete.

Once the cravings are under control or eliminated, each person then has the freedom to learn about themselves, how their addiction came about and how they can repair that damage. This process can take some time, which is why the Narconon program is not based on a time limit. Each person proceeds at his or her own rate.

For those going through recovery at Narconon, drug addiction is something that can be overcome and replaced by long-term sobriety. Find out how a Narconon drug addiction program can help someone you love who is suffering from addiction to any drug or alcohol. Call the international offices of Narconon today at 1-800-775-8750.


Resources:

http://www.justice.gov/dea/druginfo/drug_data_sheets/K2_Spice.pdf

http://waukesha.patch.com/articles/police-seize-thousands-of-dollars-in-fake-pot

John’s Drug and Alcohol Use

John is clean-cut and athletic, with short blond hair and sharp features. His quick movements and speech reveal his alert intelligence. But through all of his teens and young adulthood, he was headed for complete self-destruction through drugs. And it all started when he was just seven years old.

Drug Use Age 7

At that age, after a short multiple-choice test at his school, he was diagnosed with ADHD and prescribed Ritalin, a strong stimulant drug. His small initial dosage kept growing over the years until it had multiplied to six times his original dosage by the time he was 21 years old.

Ritalin Use to Feel Normal

His years of being given Ritalin by his mother and his doctor convinced him of one thing: He needed to take a drug to feel normal. From that idea it was a simple step to start abusing alcohol and marijuana in his early teens.

When he and his older brother started hanging out with older kids, he got introduced to LSD and mushrooms as well. He quickly found out that alcohol was the drug he preferred.

Abusing Alcohol Marijuana LSD

Drugs and Alcohol Start Ruining John’s Education

Drug Dragging Grades Down

By the time he was in high school, the effect of the drugs began to drag his grades down. He barely graduated and only made it into college with the help of a family friend. But then, since all he was doing was partying and using drugs, he flunked out in his first year.

That was the same year he began to abuse cocaine, finding the effect to be very similar to the effect of the Ritalin he was still being prescribed. The stimulating effects of the cocaine allowed him to stay up longer and drink more.

But the outside world began to interfere in his drugs and drinking. He began to be arrested for malicious mischief or DUIs. After he hit and broke a telephone pole while high on marijuana, his actions got the attention of his family who got him to rehab for the first time. It was the first time he wanted help too.

John’s First Rehab: Librium and Valium as Treatment

Librium Valium Prescribed by Rehab

This first program was a standard 28-day program. The primary treatment was medication and meetings. He was immediately given Librium and Valium and began to attend the meetings.

He left the program after 12 days but continued to go to meetings. In every meeting, he met people who had been trying to recover but were back in the meetings again after failing at sobriety, never recovering fully from their addictions. In his mind, this seemed to give him the justification he needed to start drinking again and in two weeks, he was back to hitting the bottle.

Back to Drinking Alcohol

Now he was convinced he had an incurable disease, like they had told him in the rehab. He got back into all his preferred drugs: alcohol, marijuana, cocaine. He was still taking Ritalin but most of the time crushed it and snorted it to get a stronger effect from the drug.

The Life of Constant Lying Begins

Soon he was living at home again, pretending he was going to college and picking up odd jobs as he could. Most of his money was going to the bar where he was doing his drinking. His drugs, he mooched from his friends. About this time, he said, “It was such a pit of existence that I was stuck in and I didn’t know how to get out. And it only got worse after that.”

His family continued to try to help him but he seemed unable to stay sober. He wanted to get away from their constant help and supervision and found a job selling furniture while traveling from state to state. This enabled him to keep using drugs without anyone trying to help him.

He was making plenty of money but most of it was going to drugs. Now that he was more flush, he started using more cocaine.

Using More Cocaine

He started using eightballs — an eighth of an ounce — per night. He hated the feeling cocaine gave him but found himself unable to stop.

His Father’s Death Brings John to a Turning Point

The turning point of his life came when he tried to go home to see his father just before he died. In a fateful coincidence, he got bumped to first class on the flight home, where he got all the free alcohol needed to get him completely drunk by the time he landed. His family refused to allow him to visit his father drunk. But by the morning when John was sober, his father had passed away.

Father Passed Away

He swore at that point that he would get his life together. It took a few months and one more car accident for him to turn that promise into action. After that accident, covered with blood but relatively uninjured, he looked at himself in the mirror and got honest with himself for the first time. He had to decide how to break the news to his family that he’d been using drugs because they thought he’d been doing great while he was on the road. The next day he was on a Greyhound bus for Narconon.

Greyhound Bus to Narconon

“I came to Narconon knowing that this was my last stop,” he said. “I knew I needed help and I was ready to do whatever it took.”

Getting Sober Wasn’t the Only Thing that Happened at Narconon

He not only got completely sober at Narconon, he also dedicated himself to saving others from drugs. Instead of going on the road to sell furniture and use drugs, John hit the road to deliver drug education classes in schools across the midwest states. In the next few years, he would reach more than 200,000 children face-to-face.

After feeling betrayed by his constant use of drugs, John’s family was upset with him for quite some time. Now, because of his lasting sobriety, John and his family are reconciled.

Narconon Drug Counselor

“The Narconon drug rehab program not only helped me get sober, it helped me understand why I had started using drugs in the first place,” John concluded. “And that helped me find lasting sobriety. Now I can bring my understanding to others through my drug education lectures to schoolchildren.”