Is Ibogaine the Solution to the Opiate Epidemic in Vermont?

The small and beautiful State of Vermont has been struggling with one of the country’s worst heroin and opiate painkiller epidemics. In 2014, Governor Peter Shumlin dedicated his State of the State Address to the growing problem. He said that in the prior year, nearly twice as many people died of heroin overdoses as the year before. And since 2000, the number of people entering treatment for heroin had increased more than 770%. In a state of 626,500 people, that meant that 4,300 entered treatment. It’s appropriate for the Governor Shumlin to make heroin prevention and recovery a top priority…

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Are There Dangerous Side Effects Connected with Use of Suboxone?

If you’re not familiar with it, Suboxone is the brand name of a drug that is used in the treatment of opiate addiction. It was recently in the news because the young man who shot and killed several people in South Carolina had been recently arrested for possessing Suboxone that wasn’t prescribed for him. Could Suboxone have been involved in mental problems that contributed to his shooting these people? To determine this possibility, it’s necessary to take a closer look at this drug and its side effects. What’s in Suboxone? The primary drug in this formula is buprenorphine, a synthetic…

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Opiates Gradually Overtaking Alcohol as #1 for Treatment Admissions

So far, news media have broadcast stories about two states that report similar rates of rehab admissions for opiates and alcohol. This may not be startling news until you realize that in most states, most years, alcohol far outstrips any other drug in the number of people sent to rehab. Here’s some specifics to look at. New Jersey: According to Governor Christie, nearly half of all New Jersey admissions to treat-ment in 2013 were due to opiates or synthetic opiates (opioids) like hydrocodone (Vicodin, Lor-tab), oxycodone (OxyContin, Percodan) or heroin. Chart data source: http://wwwdasis.samhsa.gov/teds07/TEDSHigh2k7.pdf Compare that to this chart showing national…

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Teens, Young Adults and Opiate Addiction: How Does it Start?

It’s a terrible thing, but far too often these days, when a teen or young adult overdoses on an opiate drug, the parents didn’t even know there was a problem. Or maybe they did know there was a problem and they tried repeatedly to handle it but their loved one could never stay sober. Finally, an overdose of heroin or a painkiller or a combination of drugs takes him away from them. How can this be happening with our young people? The following is an excellent article on the phenomenon of teenagers getting started on painkillers, especially those in athletic…

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Are There Really Opiates in Every Town in America?

It seems like everywhere you look these days, there’s news about opiates. This is both good and bad. It’s bad because this means there are so many opiates in circulation that people need to be notified that there’s a problem. But it’s good because I think more people are becoming more aware of that something is wrong and needs attention. If they are more aware of it, they will be more alert to opiate abuse by a loved one. According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, heroin abuse is on the rise. Past month use of heroin…

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Maryland’s Drug Situation Illustrates the National Problem with Heroin and Pills

Maryland has long struggled with a heroin problem. In fact, the Baltimore inner city has been renowned as a center of heroin abuse and addiction for many years. It’s not uncommon for multiple generations in the same family to seek help for addiction at the same time. But as opiate painkillers introduced a broad spectrum of people to a dependence on this type of drug, heroin abuse has followed and spread across the Maryland landscape. After all, there are drugstores in every town in every state in the US. And far too many states have unscrupulous doctors who are willing…

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Not Just Suburban Families Suffering from Painkiller Addiction

For the last several years, the mainstream media has been reporting on the way that painkiller addiction has been working its way into the homes of people who never would have used an illegal drug. This addiction was initiated by the legitimate prescribing of painkillers like Vicodin, Lortab or OxyContin. As a person’s body builds tolerance to the pills, they need more of the drug just to feel normal and keep the pain away. This route to addiction is insidious because the person using the medication may not even realize when legitimate medical use slips into misuse and addiction. Now,…

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Opiates, Opioids and the Veterans Administration

There seems to be a lot of conversations about prescription drugs these days and that’s a good thing. We have been developing a serious problem related to abuse of prescription drugs for several years so the more we talk about it, the more we may be able to join forces to overcome it. For example, there was an article about the way the Veterans Administration has been dispensing and monitoring the use of painkillers. According to VA policy, before a person is started on opioids (semi-synthetic or fully synthetic opiate-like painkillers), they are supposed to get a urine test and…

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Opiate Addiction Now Takes Many Forms But Cannot Successfully Be Treated with More Drugs

Thirty years ago, opiate addiction had a very limited range. Most opiate addicts were simply using heroin. A few might be abusing morphine and in a few regions, addicts might have access to opium. In recent years, this landscape has changed entirely. In the last couple of decades, there has been an enormous swing to prescription opiates but the effects of the addiction that results is little different from the earlier ones. Opiate addiction now could involve fentanyl, a painkiller said to be 50 times stronger than heroin, or the well-known and widely abused Oxycontin. Oxycontin abuse has been so…

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