Tag Archives: kids

“What’s the Problem with Drug Use?”

talking to your kids about drug abuseYour kids probably will not come right out and ask you this question. Most kids are going to believe what they hear from other kids and see happening right in front of them: Their friends are smoking pot or drinking and seem to be having fun. Or maybe a friend suggests that they sniff some markers and get goofy or someone has some pills that they say help you “chill out.”

It’s unfortunate that in today’s world, keeping kids safe from drug abuse is very close to the top of the list of a parent’s responsibilities. Many parents may not be well prepared to carry out this education. Or they may count on schools to do the job. Different drug education presentations have different levels of success. Plus a drug education presentation may not fully reflect a parent’s beliefs. So even if a school offers drug education classes, it’s really up to a parent more than anyone else to do this job. Continue reading

How Children are Affected by Drug Addicted Parents

With over 30 million Americans currently struggling with substance abuse or alcoholism, it is shocking to remember the byproduct and repercussions of such a deadly epidemic. Economically, at a state and federal level, the price of addiction manifests through lost productivity and other devastating ways. Fatalities, traffic accidents and injuries related to substance abuse take thousands of lives each year, not to mention the accidental overdoses that occur more frequently amongst prescription drug addicts.

Despite all these tragic losses that result from substance abuse, the most saddening byproduct of substance abuse is the neglect, abuse and maltreatment of children whose parents are addicted to drugs.

Because addiction and alcoholism alter perception and reality very frequently, children of parents who are chemically dependent are not uncommonly found to be put in harm’s way, neglected or otherwise abused.

Child Abuse Clearly Defined

The terms and circumstances, which define child abuse and neglect, are clearly defined at a federal level. According to the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, the mistreatment of children is defined as:

Any recent act or failure to act on the part of a parent or caregiver, which results in death, serious physical or emotional harm, sexual abuse or exploitation, or an act or failure to act which presents and imminent risk of serious harm.

What could this mean in the case of children put in danger by way of drug abuse in the home? While even just exposing children to dangerous and illegal drugs could easily be considered maltreatment, additional abuse or neglect may manifest in any of the following ways:

* Violence or verbal abuse resulting from being drunk or high
* Sexual abuse or behavior which makes a child feel uncomfortable
* Forcing a child to hide an adult’s drug abuse or alcoholism
* Consistently leaving a child alone at home
* Consistently ignoring a child or their needs; lack of attention

The Long Term Effects of Childhood Exposure to Drug Use

Studies exist and have been completed which focus on the long-term effects of substance abuse on the youth who are present. A shocking number of currently detained prison inmates and rehab attendees admit they had a tumultuous upbringing, having experienced some sort of neglect, or physical, sexual or verbal abuse. Further, these individuals were aware of criminality or substance abuse in their environment, setting a powerfully negative example for such youth.

It is wholly observable that children who grow up amongst drug abuse, alcoholism and criminality tend to join into these activities. This creates something of a cyclic trend, making those children who are born into underprivileged homes and neighborhoods more likely to remain ‘in the system’ than those children who are born of better circumstances with attentive, drug-free parents.

Breaking the Cycle; What Can I Do

As we look at analyzing how drug-addicted parents affect children, we conclude that the most important focus of this issue is breaking the cycle of substance abuse amongst youth. Many youth have entered into drug and/or alcohol abuse paths of their own, largely due to their exposure to such activities as a young child. However, this cycle can be taken apart and the course of youth lives can be changed.

* Support local children and family centers; these groups offer a safe environment and supportive care to children when parents are unable to.

* Demand drug education in all schools in your area; although drug prevention begins in the home, having preventative education at a young age continues to be an effective way to keep kids off drugs.

Source:

https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/usermanuals/substanceuse/chapterthree.cfm

With More than Half of All High School Students Abusing Drugs, Should Parents be Using More Drug Tests?

Students Abusing Drugs

Parents should take note of recent reports on drug abuse among teens and young adults and also those that find that when parents speak out against drug abuse, drug abuse statistics are lower.

According to the most recent Monitoring the Future report on drug use among our schoolchildren, by the time they graduate from high school, more than half have abused an illicit drug or prescription drug. Is there anything parents should do to prevent drug use among their children or should they just rely on home or school drug tests?

Certainly parents come in all shapes and sizes. Some hope their children will not use drugs, some are too wrapped up in other concerns to pay much attention to the matter and some take effective action to fight drug or alcohol abuse by their children. It can be hard to tell which path is the most effective.

Is the best route to skip drug education and simply administer frequent drug tests? Certainly drug tests are in the news recently, as the Ohio School Board deliberated on the best method of using random drug tests among students in performance and competitive events. And in Florida, debate continued over whether or not it was proper to give welfare recipients drug tests as a condition of receiving their benefits.

On this point, parents can look to recent reports from the National Center on Addiction and Drug Abuse at Columbia University (CASA) for evidence of what methods are available to them to prevent drug abuse by their children.

According to CASA, something as simple as family dinners together makes a big difference. Look at this comparison, for example. CASA compared teens who have frequent family dinners (five to seven per week) with those who have fewer than three per week.

Teens with fewer family dinners are:

  • Nearly four times as likely to use tobacco
  • More than twice as likely to drink alcohol
  • More than twice as likely to smoke marijuana
  • Almost four times as likely to say they expect to use drugs at some point in the future.

CASA’s surveys also show that it is essential for parents to agree on their drug use and alcohol use messages. When parents do not agree completely on their anti-drug message to teens, those children are 3.5 times more likely to expect to use drugs in the future. When parents don’t agree on an anti-alcohol use message, teens are twice as likely to drink as other children whose parents do agree.

Narconon Centers Sponsor Drug Education Classes in Hundreds of Schools to Help Reduce Drug Abuse

Schedule Drug Education Presentation

Along with running centers that provide drug rehabilitation services around the world, Narconon staff from many centers go out into the community to deliver anti-drug messages to young people. From Narconon Arrowhead in Oklahoma and centers in Southern California and Italy alike, staff teach children of all ages in schools and clubs the dangers of illicit or prescription drug abuse or alcohol abuse. When the anti-drug curriculum is from Narconon, schools can find that their drug problems drop. A peer-reviewed study, published on the website www.substanceabusepolicy.com, reported on the decrease in drug abuse among students who had received the entire Narconon curriculum.

CASA studies report that a young person who does not start abusing drugs or alcohol until he or she is 21 years old is virtually certain never to do so. The best tools to use to prevent drug or alcohol abuse are accurate lessons in the problems created by substance abuse and parental concern, communication and attention.

Call a center near you to find out more about the Narconon objectives used in the drug education presentations.


Resources:

http://monitoringthefuture.org/pubs/monographs/mtf-overview2011.pdf

http://www.casacolumbia.org/templates/publications_reports.aspx: The Importance of Family Dinners VII and National Survey of

American Attitudes on Substance Abuse XVI: Teens and Parents

http://www.substanceabusepolicy.com/content/3/1/8

http://www.bcrnews.com/2012/01/24/ohio-looks-at-drug-testing-options/ac9ga6f/

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/jan/25/florida-primary-candidates-drug-policy?newsfeed=true

Making Sure Your Child Never Needs Drug Rehab

The care a child receives in making sure he or she does not abuse drugs varies greatly from household to household. In some, parents monitor their children’s activities closely and educate their children on problems associated with substance abuse. Sadly, at the other end of the scale are households where the child’s first drug use was actually with the parent. While this is a small number, it is tragic that it happens at all.

In most households, parents do make an attempt to prevent their child from using drugs. But it seems like the decks are stacked against parents.

Here’s why:

Marijuana: A parent can explain why it is wrong to use marijuana but any child who watches television or reads news knows that the drug is given to sick people by doctors.

Alcohol: Television advertising, especially during sports shows, features an abundance of alcohol advertising.

Prescription drugs: From pain killers to so-called “study drugs,” these are also prescribed by medical doctors.

Keeping one’s child safe means first of all, setting a good example of disciplined alcohol use, minimal prescription drug use and no illicit drug use. Education starts by example.

Second, it’s going to be necessary to explain that even if drugs are prescribed or openly advertised, there are negative effects associated with all these types of drugs, and that use can easily get out of control.

Third, a child who is goal-oriented is less likely to be derailed by drugs. Work with a child to develop goals he or she wants to achieve and feels are doable. Praise her accomplishments. Help him work out solutions to the obstacles.

Despite Best Efforts, Some Young People May Need a Rehabilitation Program

Despite education and monitoring, some young people will become dependent on or addicted to illicit or prescription drugs or alcohol. But recovery through drug rehab is possible and those dreams can come in sight once again. This is the result of the Narconon drug and alcohol recovery program, delivered at Narconon recovery centers around the world.

The Narconon drug rehab program does not use any other drugs as part of recovery but instead supports a person through withdrawal and detoxification with generous doses of nutritional supplements. Nutrition, along with time spent in a low-heat sauna and moderate exercise has been shown to initiate an exceptional detoxification process that flushes drug residues out of the fatty tissues where they tend to lodge. When these residues are removed, the person in recovery normally says that cravings are lower or gone, and that his or her outlook is brighter and energy is better.

Once outlook is improved, it is easier to recover the life skills the will keep one safe when rehab is completed. Life skills like the ability to use communication to resolve problems, ability to change conditions for the better, to isolate those people in one’s life who might create problems and a solid moral code that provides guidance. All these aspects of good survival are addressed on the Narconon addiction treatment program. Narconon school programs help prevent the need for addiction programs by providing drug education, but when addiction does arrive, this organization also provides rehabilitation.

Addiction treatment is seldom accomplished in the 28 to 30 days of short-term programs. It takes long than that to fully detoxify and then develop sober living skills. Learn how the Narconon program can put addiction problems in the past and help build a bright future again.