The Rise in Heroin Use May Be Linked to the Decline in Prescription Drug Abuse

In the middle of January, an issue of the New England Journal of Medicine featured a report that was heralded as cause for celebration. The report carried news that the rates of prescription painkiller abuse and addiction in the United States were finally starting to decline, after years of alarming increases. Astonishing numbers of Americans had gone from using painkillers medically to abusing their pills, and finally many became addicted. Things got so bad that more than 15,000 people were dying every year, in what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention termed a “deadly epidemic” of painkiller abuse. So…

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New Report Shows More People Start on Heroin after Prescription Drugs

It’s been obvious for the last few years that plenty of people were getting addicted to prescription opiates first and then migrating to heroin because it was cheaper and more accessible. A new report makes it clear that far more people are going down this path than I ever thought. For many decades, people might start with alcohol or marijuana and then make their way to cocaine or heroin. In the 1960s and 1970s, according this this report from NationalPainReport.com, heroin users were mostly male members of minorities, living in the inner cities. Fast forward to the last several years.…

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Where Did All this Heroin Come From?

Once upon a time, not so long ago, it was inconceivable that the average American would be addicted to heroin. It was only something that maybe people out on the fringes of society would do. Maybe bikers or jazz musicians or people who spent a lot of time in jail. This never really was the truth, but it was the impression most middle class Americans had. No one THEY knew would ever use heroin, much less be addicted to it. Fast forward to this decade. The growing heroin problem in this country is overwhelming public health departments. Not a day…

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Is the Next US Drug Trend Going to be Heroin?

The Washington Post just published an article that could be predicting a terrifying trend. According to an April 6th article, Mexican farmers are pulling out their marijuana crops and planting heroin poppies instead. So cheap heroin (far cheaper than prescription painkillers) has been increasingly found crossing the border. Here’s what I am concerned about. As more states authorize the use of marijuana for medical or recreational use, there will be more of that drug in circulation. Prices will come down. That is, of course, the main reason Mexican farmers are changing their crops. They want a crop with a higher…

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What if we didn’t focus on the heroin epidemic or marijuana but just raised drug-free kids?

I’m watching the headlines these days and there’s so much about this drug or that – Philip Seymour Hoffman’s death triggered plenty of media coverage on the increase in heroin abuse. Zohydro is in the news as a future opiate painkiller formulation that has the potential to be easily abused by anyone with a taste for opiates. Medical marijuana is approved in state after state and several more states have this initiative on the ballot. One celebrity after another is cited or goes to jail for a DUI until it seems like no one is left sober. After a while,…

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The Sad State of Many Heroin Addicts

When the unaddicted public thinks of heroin addicts, I suspect that they think of someone strung out due to withdrawal sickness, the way Frank Sinatra was in the movie Man with a Golden Arm. Or if they know something about the drug, they might picture someone “on the nod,” in other words, nodding off as the opiate makes them drowsy. Not many people realize that many heroin addicts just get enough of the drug to “get well,” as they call it. What they mean is that the amount of heroin they have will just keep the dopesickness, the withdrawal pains…

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5 Reasons Prescription Addiction Turns to Heroin

With recent news and national surveys indicating that more and more prescription addicts are turning to heroin, we decided to investigate the 5 main reasons why this is happening. Here is what we found: Heroin Is a Prescription Drug Heroin is itself a prescription drug that was more widely used around the turn of the 19th century. When used for prescription purposes, it is referred to as diamorphine. It has recently been studied by researchers in the Netherlands who were looking for a way to more effectively treat heroin addicts. The routine treatment for heroin addiction in the mainline medical…

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Why it’s Not Surprising that Heroin Use Soars for Suburban Teens

Recent news reports are describing the increases in heroin abuse among American teenagers. These are not urban teens but suburban ones. Heroin rates in large Northeastern cities have always been higher than in suburbs or rural areas but that trend has been changing. Parents who moved their children out to the suburbs where they thought their kids would be safer are finding that heroin seems to have followed them to their new homes. But if you have been tracking with the changes in drug abuse in the last few years, it’s no surprise that heroin use soars for suburban teens.…

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Better Solution Needed to Addiction when Abuse of Opioid Drugs Hits All Time High

It’s one thing to talk about the problem and completely another to define the solution. Many voices are in agreement that abuse of opioid drugs has hit an all-time high. But few voices define a solution that will have a better result than that which is offered at the moment. Many drug rehab programs define success as retention, or someone who stays in or completes a rehab program. This is one of the defining principles behind the administration of a methadone or buprenorphine-based treatment program for opiate addiction. Both methadone and buprenorphine are opioid drugs (similar to opiates) and both…

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Litany of Heroin Deaths in Alabama Illustrates Fatal Dangers of Addiction

The shift from OxyContin to heroin and people trying to get high after getting clean are some of the reasons for the upsurge in deaths in Alabama. In May 2012, the Birmingham News provided some grim insight into the fatal results of addiction. In just the month of April, Jefferson County had thirteen deaths from heroin. In all of 2010, there were only 12 deaths from the drug and in 2011, a total of 30 people died. What makes the situation worse is that many of those who died were so very young: a 28-year old man, 38-year old man,…

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