Tag Archives: deaths

Teen Deaths Related to Prescription Drug Abuse Skyrocket

Teen Prescription Drug Deaths
In April 2012, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released some startling statistics on the number of teens being lost to prescription drug abuse. Between the years 2000 and 2009, the number of children losing their lives to poisoning went up 90%. The CDC stated that the major reason for this increase is the growing abuse of prescription drugs by teens.

It’s doubtful that parents perceive that teen deaths related to prescription drug abuse skyrocket. They may only see that their child died, or perhaps they were lucky and their child was simply rushed to an emergency room for an overdose but survived. Or maybe they got the young person into a rehabilitation center in time to prevent these dire circumstances.

Despite Advanced Protections of Children, US Rate of Child Deaths is High

It could be argued that the US has far more protections of their children than most other countries. There are multitudes of laws in place to protect children or create safe communities. Despite this, the US has a rate of child injury death – including drug poisoning – far greater than many other countries. For example, the US rate of 8.65 children’s injury deaths per 100,000 people is more than four times that of Sweden and nearly twice that of Canada. Among American states, the worst rates are seen in South Carolina, Alaska, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Wyoming, South Dakota and Mississippi.

Teens Acquire Prescription Drugs Most Often from Medicine Chests

The primary way that teens acquire prescription drugs to abuse is by stealing them from their own home or the home of someone else. Even a guest who has a pill bottle in her purse could have some pills stolen by a teen with a craving for drugs. Addictive medications, particularly pain pills, must be protected from theft by storing pill bottles in a locked medicine chest. While this is inconvenient, any visitor to the home could steal just enough pills that the shortage might not be noticed. When teen deaths related to prescription drugs skyrocket, then changes need to occur.

At Narconon, Drug Addiction to Pain Medication Can be Overcome

A person who becomes trapped in addiction does not have to feel like their formerly happy life is gone forever. They can recover their personal integrity again and learn how to live sober. And it does not have to be a grim struggle to overcome an assault of daily cravings.

For Narconon, drug addiction responds to a long-term holistic program that deals with the three main components that trap a person in addiction: guilt, cravings and depression. It has been found in forty-five years of helping addicts recover their sobriety that guilt, cravings and depression can be lifted and eliminated. There do not need to be further drugs administered to cover up these problems and give a person a weak apparency of an enjoyable life. Cravings can be addressed with the Narconon New Life Detoxification Program, a thorough detox that flushes out residues from drug use that become stored in fatty tissues. The presence of these residues have been shown to contribute to the triggering of cravings. Those finishing this detox talk about how much lower their cravings are. Some people even say they are gone.

Guilt is lifted by helping a person understand how personal integrity is lost and how it can be restored again, then guiding them through that process. As guilt is replaced by relief, it is common for those in this phase of recovery to talk about the weight that is lifted from them.

Depression can be lightened for some people by boosting their physical condition with nutritional supplements. It is well known that drugs and toxic exposures cause the body to burn up nutrients, so administering generous doses of nutrition help lift the mood. Then as a person works through repairing relationships that were damaged in the past and recovering self-esteem, depression related to addiction usually needs no further treatment.

Learn more about Narconon; drug addiction does not have to destroy the life of someone you love. Call today for further information: 1-800-775-8750.

Resources:

http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/ChildInjury/infographic-text.html

http://www.cdc.gov/injury/about/focus-rx.html

Litany of Heroin Deaths in Alabama Illustrates Fatal Dangers of Addiction

Heroin Deaths

The shift from OxyContin to heroin and people trying to get high after getting clean are some of the reasons for the upsurge in deaths in Alabama.

In May 2012, the Birmingham News provided some grim insight into the fatal results of addiction. In just the month of April, Jefferson County had thirteen deaths from heroin. In all of 2010, there were only 12 deaths from the drug and in 2011, a total of 30 people died.

What makes the situation worse is that many of those who died were so very young: a 28-year old man, 38-year old man, one who was 18, another who was 24, a nineteen-year-old, a 21-year old woman, and a 32-year old woman. All dead of heroin, often with syringes next to the bodies.

Heroin Abuse Supplies

Across the country, many people are seeking heroin supplies after the reformulation of Oxycontin, their prior preferred drug of choice. Once OxyContin pills were made hard to abuse by making them gummy, heroin deaths began to creep up. The effects of OxyContin and heroin abuse are said to be very much the same. So individuals who previously used prescription fraud to obtain drugs now had to find a street drug dealer to score heroin which was sometimes sold at half the price.

Inexperience Using Heroin Contributes to Deaths

But a number of factors now conspire to cause to these deaths:

  • OxyContin users were accustomed to a consistent potency so knew how to dose themselves with that drug
  • Heroin’s potency varies greatly
  • OxyContin users are not used to dosing themselves with the variable heroin potency
  • To make things worse, Mexican drug cartels began smuggling in a high potency heroin in 2011

Heroin Drug Deal

Heroin dealers have plenty of customers and potential customers – so customer service and concern is not part of the job.

Another factor in some of these deaths is that some people may have wanted to get high again after being clean for awhile. When they gave themselves a “usual” dosage, they couldn’t tolerate it and overdosed. Some of the people who died had recently graduated from drug court or been to rehab.

In St. Louis, the story was much the same. According to the news site BND.com, heroin deaths in the area almost doubled in 2009 and then maintained that peak in 2010. Over a five-year period, 357 residents of the area died due to heroin overdoses. Here too, many of those who died were young.

Not Isolated Incidents

 

“Unfortunately, these are not isolated incidents,” stated Bobby Wiggins, longtime drug educator and spokesperson for Narconon International. Narconon is a non-profit organization dedicated to the elimination of substance abuse and addiction. “The same scenario is playing out from Minneapolis to San Diego. These people are trying to stave off the sickness of opiate withdrawal with whatever drug they can find. Fortunately, at Narconon we have developed a tolerable method of withdrawal followed by an effective method of rehabilitation that can save some of these people who feel trapped in their addictions.”

At any of the fifty Narconon rehab centers around the world, addicts are supported through withdrawal by giving them generous dosages of nutritional supplements that help the body through the withdrawal period and calm many of the symptoms. Relaxing physical assists help the person relax and stop being anxious about recovery. The rehab program that follows is so effective that seven out of ten graduates stay sober after they go home.

There are only three outcomes to addiction: prison, death or sobriety,” Mr. Wiggins said. “We help people choose lasting sobriety.”

Heroin Rehab Help

For more information about heroin rehabilitation on the Narconon program, call 1-800-775-8750.


Resources:

http://blog.al.com/spotnews/2012/05/jefferson_county_sees_spike_in.html

http://www.bnd.com/2011/09/18/1863590/dope-sick-youths-migrate-to-heroin.html