Narconon Releases A Special Report On New Designer Drug Smiles

You may have heard about the variety of party drugs out there–meth, Ecstasy, and others.  Recently a new wave of synthetic drugs has hit the streets and schools, including bath salts and synthetic marijuana, or K2.  While they were recently made illegal, drug chemists have come up with a new designer drug that has not yet made the illicit drug list: “Smiles”.

It sounds appealing, doesn’t it?  Think again.  Smiles, or 2C-1, may bring about euphoria, but with it comes a rush of other dangerous side effects including hallucinations, rapid heartbeats and psychotic episodes.  Some describe it as LSD and methamphetamine combined.  The hallucinations are described as very vivid and can last anywhere from a few hours to several days.

Grisly Accounts Of Smiles Use

Because the drug is somewhat new, having been created in Europe in 2003 and only recently reaching the United States, not much has been done to study it.  The most abundant information about this substance comes from user accounts, and most of them are terrifying.

One user took Smiles and began shaking, growling and foaming at the mouth, according to witnesses.  He began smashing his head on the ground, and his friends said he was acting possessed.  He stopped breathing two hours later.

Another user described his experience with Smiles online, saying that it made things appear extremely beautiful at first, but when he looked more closely at it would suddenly become very strange.  He said his girlfriend’s face appeared completely black to him, and then the black started dripping out of her eye.

Another described it as a roller coaster ride from hell.

It is untraceable in urine tests, and due to lack of experience with the drug, it makes it difficult for physicians and emergency room technicians to recognize and treat an overdose.  However, they are becoming more familiar with its effects, which can include seizures, kidney failure, and fatally high blood pressure.  Another manifestation it produces is something called “uncoupling”, which means that the user’s muscles become so rigid that they won’t relax and the temperature soars, usually leading to death.

The fact that it is untraceable in drug tests makes it an appealing drug among party-loving teens, college athletes, those entering the military, and anyone required to take a urine test.

Easy Drug Marketing

The trouble with synthetic drugs is that drug designers are continually changing the formulas, and shirking the law by doing so.  Some chemicals may not yet be illegal, so by using them in a new compound it can be promoted as a legal drug.  This is how it was with bath salts and synthetic marijuana until they were put on the illicit drug list this summer.
As a result, hype about Smiles is spreading like a virus, infecting homes and children’s bedrooms through the Internet.  Officials state that drugs used to take longer to spread, but since the advent of the Internet they get around much faster through online word of mouth.

A newer version of Smiles–called 25b-Nbome–has already started showing up in Australia, and it appears to be even more gruesome than the original.  It caused multiple overdoses in the last month, with the most newsworthy being the teen who threw his body into trees and power line poles while high, ultimately killing himself.
In an effort to curb the problem www.narconon.org urges parents to talk to their kid about Smiles and the dangers associated with the drug. Schools should also make their students aware of the effects of synthetics to stop use.

For more information contact www.narconon.org.

Source:  http://www.whsv.com/news/headlines/Special-Report-New-Designer-Drug-Smiles-175892691.html